Results 1 to 3 of 3

SALT and Low Carb WOE

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    6,119
    BMI
    26.7

    SALT and Low Carb WOE

    Even Atkins says we need at least 1/2 tsp of salt a day, when we are eating under 50 net carbs a day. I take 1/4 tsp in am and 1/4 tsp before bed and liberally salt throughout the day or drink two cups of broth a day. It also helps relieve leg cramping at night.

    From, The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living , (The latest LOW CARB book and it is FANTASTIC!) by Jeff Volek, PhD, RD & Stephen Phinney, MD, PhD

    "The short answer is that the amount of carbohydrate in our diet changes our need for salt. High carbohydrate diets make the kidneys retain salt, whereas a low carbohydrate intake increases sodium excretion by the kidney.

    Salt and water are more efficiently excreted, which is a good thing as long as you maintain an adequate minimum sodium intake. Ignore this lesson and you are likely to suffer the completely avoidable problems of headache, fatigue, weakness, and consipation."


    Dr. Eades has also written about this recently in his blog:

    "The good news is that itís great to get rid of the excess fluid but it comes at a cost, which is the bad news. As the excess fluid goes, it takes with it sodium an extremely important electrolyte. When sodium levels fall below a critical threshold (which can happen within a short time), symptoms often occur, the most common being fatigue, headache, cramps and postural hypotension.

    Postural hypotension happens when you stand up too quickly and feel faint. Or even pass out briefly. Itís a sign of dehydration. So if youíve started your low-carb diet, made your multiple runs to the bathroom, and jump up off the couch to answer the phone and feel like your going to faint (or actually do pass out momentarily) and have to sit back down quickly, youíve got postural hypotension. Itís really easy to fix Ė you simply need to take more sodium and drink more water. Salt your food more. Increasing sodium is just another one of the many counter-intuitive things about low-carb dieting. Just like eating more fat to lower your cholesterol. Youíve got to start thinking differently. The low-carb diet is one that absolutely requires more sodium. A lot more sodium.

    ...get some Celtic Sea Salt, Himalayan Salt or one of the other grayish, pinkish kind of grungy looking salts and replace your normal salt with these. And donít use them sparingly. These salts have been harvested either from ancient sea beds or obtained by evaporation of sea water with high mineral content and contain about 70 percent of the sodium of regular salt (which has been refined, bleached and processed until it is pretty much pure sodium chloride, often with anti-caking agents added). The other 30 percent of the volume is other minerals and micronutrients (including iodine) found in mineral-rich seas. Consuming these salts is not just following a Paleolithic diet using modern food, but, depending upon the origin of the salt, it is consuming the same food your Paleolithic ancestors ate. I much prefer these salts taste-wise to regular salt, and I salt the heck out of all my food with it."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    6,119
    BMI
    26.7
    Bump up

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Northern Alabama
    Posts
    100
    BMI
    33.3
    I also use the natural Himalayan pink sea salt. It has trace minerals in it, and the taste is "saltier" than plain salt. Even iodized salt does not have the optimal amount of iodine in it, and all of the minerals are chemically processed out, so all that it is by the time they are done processing, is a chemical compound, and some consider it to be toxic to the body at this point.
    The iodine that is added might be enough to keep a person from showing obvious signs of iodine deficiency, but it is certainly not enough to supply our body with all of the iodine that our body needs, since every part of the body needs iodine to make hormones, not just the thyroid.
    Since I am eating more raw, natural foods and healthy fats and oils, I actually do not use as much salt as I did when I was eating the SAD diet with lots of foods that required salt to taste good.

Please reply to this thread with any new information or opinions.

Similar Threads

  1. salt
    By Kinected 1 in forum Induction
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-10-2011, 07:35 AM
  2. Salt
    By gastqvalta in forum Induction
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-06-2008, 01:07 AM
  3. Salt
    By jennygump777 in forum Induction
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-21-2007, 11:28 PM
  4. Salt
    By nightclerk in forum Atkins
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-01-2004, 06:25 PM
  5. Salt?
    By L.T. Strife in forum Induction
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-02-2004, 05:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •